Category Archives: Big Data

Shell Chooses Azure Platform for AI

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is making its way into many industries today, helping to solve business problems and helping with efficiency. In this post, I’d like to share an interesting story about Shell choosing Azure for their AI platform. Shell Oil Company chose to use C3 IoT for their IoT device management and Azure for their predictive analytics.

Let’s look at how Shell is using this technology:

  • The operations that are required to fix a drill or piece of equipment in the field is much more significant when it’s unexpected. Shell can use AI to look at when maintenance is required on compressors, valves and other equipment that’s used for oil drilling. This will help to reduce unplanned downtime and repair efforts. If they can keep up with maintenance before equipment fails, they can plan downtime and do so at much less cost.
  • They’ll use AI to help steer the drill bits through shale deposits to find the best quality shale deposits.
  • Failures of equipment of great size, such as drilling equipment, can have a lot of related damage and danger. This technology will improve the safety of employees and customers by helping to reduce unexpected failures.
  • AI enabled drills will help chart a course for the well itself as it’s being drilled, as well as providing constant data from the drill bits on what type of material is being drilled through. The benefits here are 2-fold; they will get data on quality deposits and reduce the wear and tear on the drill. If the drill is using an IoT device to detect a harder material, they’ll have the knowledge to drill in a different area or to figure out the best path to reduce the wear and tear.
  • It will free up the geologists and engineers to be able to manage more drills at one time, making them more efficient, as well as reactive to deal with problems as they arise while drilling.

As with everything in Azure, this platform is a highly scalable platform that will allow Shell to grow with what is required, plus have the flexibility to take on new workloads. With IoT and AI, these workloads are very easily scaled using Azure as a platform and all the services available with it.

I wanted to share this interesting use case about Shell because it really displays the capabilities of the Azure Platform to solve the mundane and enable the unthinkable.

Overview of Azure Elastic Database Jobs Service

Today I’ll give an overview of Microsoft’s newly released (in preview) Elastic Database Jobs service. This is considered as a fully hosted Azure service, whereas the previous iteration was a custom hosted and managed version available on SQL DB and SQL DW within Azure.

It’s similar in capability to an on prem SQL Server Agent, but it can reach across multiple servers, subscriptions and regions. SQL Agent is limited to just the instance on the server for the database that you’re managing. This gives you a much wider range across all your different Azure services.

Other benefits and features:

  • Significant capability added that can enable automation and execution of T-SQL jobs with PowerShell, REST API or T-SQL APIs against a group of databases.
  • Can be used for a wide variety of maintenance tasks, such as rebuilding indexes, schema changes, collecting query results and performance monitoring. Think of it in terms of a developer who’s managing many databases across multiple subscriptions to support multiple lines of business or web applications with the same database schema and they want to make a change to it.
  • The capability to maintain a larger number of databases with similar operations and it allows management for whatever databases you specify and that will ensure an optimum customer experience. You’ll also ensure maximum efficiency to maintain your databases without having to set up specific jobs on each of those servers, and to tap into them and make changes more efficiently during off hours and scale up/down when you need to. Plus, you can change that schema across all those databases with a simple interface.
  • Schedule administrative tasks that otherwise would have to be manually done.
  • Allows for some small schema changes, credential management, performance database, or even telemetry collection if you want insight into what people are doing on the databases.
  • Build indexes off hours.
  • Collect query results from multiple databases for central performance management, so you can collect this info into one place, then render info into a portal like Power BI.

Basically, it reduces management maintenance overhead with its ability to go across subscriptions. Normally, you’d have to have that job run on a specific server; but now within Azure, where you are running managed databases, you can run operations across those databases without having to set up separate jobs.

So, a cool feature – it’s now only in preview so it’s sure to grow and I’m excited about the direction.

 

Key Terminology in Azure Databricks

In a previous post, I talked about Azure Databricks and what it is. In review, Azure Databricks is a managed platform for running Apache Spark jobs. As it’s managed, that means you don’t have to worry about managing the cluster or running performance maintenance to use Spark, like you would if you were going to deploy a full HDInsight Spark cluster.

Databricks provides a simple to operate user interface for data scientist and analysts when building models, as well as a powerful API that allows for some automation. You also can run role-based access control with Active Directory for better user integration at a more granular scale. You don’t have to tear down an HDInsight cluster to use Spark jobs as you can pause (or start) your resources on demand and scale up/out as needed.

In this post, I’ll run through some key Databricks terms to give you an overview of the different points you’ll use when running Databricks jobs:

    • Workspace – This is the central place that will allow you to organize all the work that’s being done. You can think of it as a ‘folder’ structure where you can save Notebooks and Libraries that you want to operate on and manipulate data with, and then share them securely with other users. Workspace is not meant for storing data; data should be stored in the data storage.
    • Notebooks – This is a set of any number of cells that allow you to execute commands with a programming language, such as Scala, Python, R or SQL; you can specify the language when you open a cell at the top of the Notebook. Here you can also create a dashboard that allows the output of the code to be shared rather than the code itself, and they can be scheduled as jobs for running pipelines, updating models or dashboards.
    • Libraries – These are packages or modules that provide additional functionality for developing various models for different types of analysis. Like a traditional IDE environment like Visual Studio where you have libraries you can plug in and add.
    • Tables – This is where the structured data is stored that you and your team will use for analysis. They can live in cloud storage or in the cluster that’s being used or store them in memory for faster processing of the data.
    • Clusters – Essentially a group of compute resources being used for operations like executing the code from Notebooks or Libraries. You can also pull in data from raw sources like cloud or structured/semi structured data or the data in the tables I mentioned above. Clusters can be controlled via access policies using Active Directory integration.
    • Jobs – Jobs are a tool that’s used to schedule execution within a cluster. These can be scripts using Python or JAR assemblies and you can create manual triggers that will send the jobs off or run them through a REST API.
    • Apps – Think of these as the third-party components that can tap into your Databricks cluster. A good scenario is visualizing the data with apps like Tableau or Power BI. You can consume the modules that you built and the output of the Notebooks or script that you ran to visualize that data.

Azure Data Factory V2 in GA and New Features

Today I’m excited to talk about the general availability of Azure Data Factory V2, as well as some new features that have been added over the last couple months. If you don’t know, Azure Data Factory Version 2 added some new features that V1 didn’t have.

With ADF V2 you get a browser-based interface using drag and drop technology; V1 was primarily done in the Visual Studio IDE. It also added triggers for scheduling, so you can schedule your jobs when required and in additional ways (which I’ll discuss further in a bit).

Some other features of ADF V2 that came out as it became generally available:

  • Lift and Shift operations for your SSIS packages, so if you have SSIS packages local, you can now Lift and Shift those into compute with the integration runtime service in Data Factory.
  • This also allows for cloud to cloud, cloud to prem, prem to prem and some third-party tools are supported within that as well.
  • Control flow activities like link branching, looping, conditional execution and parameterization.
  • Integration with HD Spark and Databricks for big data workloads and data science.

Some features that have come out more recently:

  • Integration with Key Vault, which gives you the ability to encrypt keys and small secrets like passwords used for keys. You can create a Linked Service to a Key Vault and reference those needed passwords rather than having to store those in search or text files or a PowerShell script and have those open. So, you can use Key Vault to reference back and run workloads without having to expose those passwords.
  • The ability to monitor Data Factory using OMS, Microsoft’s cloud-based management solution that helps you manage and protect your on-prem and cloud infrastructure. This is quick and easy to set up and allows you to reach in to different types of applications in Azure and give you additional visibility and control for things like log analytics, automation, data protection and recovery, as well as security and compliance.
  • You can monitor the overall health of your Data Factories and be able to drill in, see the details and troubleshoot if you’re having problems. This is all enable through Azure Analytics, so you turn on your Azure Analytics and Data Factory, then hook those into your OMS suite and you can monitor it as that central management point.
  • Event based triggering with integration through Data Factory. Now you have event driven architecture where you have a common data integration pattern that involves production. Instead of having to schedule a timed trigger, you can monitor a blob creation or deletion, add that file into there and you can trigger your pipeline based on that.

Azure Data Factory V2 is a neat technology and I’m interested to see where it goes as I’m sure that more features will be coming. If you have questions about Azure Data Factory or any of the new Azure resources, we are the people to talk with. We’re doing a lot of work with our clients using Azure tools and we’d love to talk to you about how we can get you using Azure in your organization.

Azure Blob Storage Lifecycle Management

When we talk about blob storage, we talk about the three different tiers – hot, cool or archive – for delegating the importance of data and how accessible it is. The challenge has been that when we picked the tier that was pretty much the end of story.

What we want is have our data accessible when and where we need it as it can take some time to pull from cool and archive tiers, as well as be costlier to retrieve. Also, with the more expensive hot tier, data can sit there unnecessarily, and we need a way to move it out after it becomes static or stale.

Here’s some good news! Microsoft recently introduced the public preview of Blob Storage Lifecycle Management. This now makes it easier to manage and automate that movement of data by offering a rule-based policy which you can use to transition your data to the best access tier, as well as expire data at the end of its lifecycle.

This great new toolset allows capability and flexibility to define rules for transitioning blobs to a cooler storage. You can also delete blobs by defining how long a blob should live there, define rules to be executed daily or apply rules to storage containers or subsets of blobs, thus allowing you to access certain blob containers and delete others that you specify based on how you’re moving that data around.

So, you can set up a scenario where data hasn’t been accessed in 3 months and it’s set to be transitioned from hot storage to cool, but then it sits there for 6 more months. You then want to be able to move that data off to archive. These are settings you can change based on the last modification date of the file.

You also can delete blob snapshots that have become stale after a defined period of time. Maybe you set it to delete after 120 days or maybe blobs that haven’t been accessed for a several year period—seven years being the magic number for audits and such.

Microsoft is great at listening to what users have to say and to keep evolving and adding more capability to the technology. If you love data, Azure and Azure Blob Storage as much as I do, let me know by sharing this video.

 

Overview of HDInsight R Server

Today I’ll wrap up my series on HDInsight with R Server. What R Server does is when you create an HDInsight cluster, you can select it as an option and it will provide data scientists, statisticians and R Programmers with on demand access to scalable and distributed methods of analytics on HDInsight.

Where it is open source, R allows you to leverage any of the 8,000+ open source packages. Because it falls in Microsoft’s big data analytics package, it includes the scale R routines. These routines provide things such as descriptive statistics, generalized linear models, logistic regression, classification and regression trees, as well as decision forests.

You can run an edge node outside of a cluster that provides a great place to connect on the cluster. You can also run your R scripts which gives the option of running parallel distributed functions. The models that are built can be downloaded for on prem use and can also be sent to Azure Machine Learning Studio for further processing and scoring.

So, why would you choose the Microsoft R Server over other options?

  • Microsoft is putting a lot behind AI and R Server and this big data offering as part of the HDInsight suite.
  • It provides an internally built set of algorithms and when you combine that with the open source community offerings, you create a bridge for cutting edge AI, machine and deep learning applications.
  • As with other Azure offerings, you’re getting a simplified, secure, highly scalable environment, so instead of wasting time building those clusters in-house, you can focus on the capabilities of the platform itself by quickly and easily spinning up a cluster.

Many of these topics have been discussed throughout this series about the capabilities of HDInsight and what each has to offer. Looking at R, some key features are:

    • R enabled for the R programming language with runtime infrastructure for script execution.
    • Also, Python enabled with runtime infrastructure for Python scripting.
    • Pre-trained models to help with visual analytics and text statement analysis that is ready to score the data you provide.
    • You can put the server into operations and deploy solutions as a web service very quickly; so you spin up your cluster, turn everything on, hook it into your domain, use your domain credentials and start training your models.
    • Remote web execution allows us to work from our work station and train models, rather than having to log directly into the server or use SSH or other means. It allows you to build your scripts locally and then execute them remotely, giving you more flexibility with the way you’re operating.

R Server fits within the Azure and HDInsight ecosystems, so you can use and easily integrate these technologies together, such as integrating with Azure Data Factory or Azure Data Bricks, etc.

Overview of HDInsight Interactive Query

Last week I began a series on HDInsight. Today I’m continuing that series with a focus on Interactive Query. Interactive Query leverages Hive which uses LLAP (Long Live and Process), also known as low latency analytical processing. This allows for interactivity with complex data warehouse-style queries on big data, that is stored in commodity storage, such as a blob or Data Lake Store.

This stand-alone cluster is separate from HDI Hadoop clusters; it only contains the Hive service. The LLAP replaces the direct interaction with the HDFS data node, allowing for caching, prefetching, some light query processing and access control. Heavier query processing workloads are still happening at the yarn container with text orchestration, and that helps with the overall execution.

Obviously, it’s much more efficient to be able to query the data interactively where the data is prepared, rather than needing to move the data from one storage location to another, as we normally would with data warehousing. It allows for faster insight and resiliency, as well as reduced effort and simplified architecture – less components meets more simplicity.

There are several ways to execute Hive queries from Interactive Query:

  • Power BI, so you can tap right into it with your Power BI reports
  • Zeppelin notebooks
  • Visual Studio
  • Ambari with Hive View
  • Beeline from head node or an empty edge node
  • ODBC

You can also leverage existing workloads, so if you’re running batch or ETL workloads using HDInsight, you can attach your Interactive Query cluster to an existing metastore and data storage without any additional overhead.

There may be a need to convert CSV or JSON files into ORC, Parquet or Avro field as they can be more efficient for Hadoop processing. But with Interactive Query, that need is either lessened or eliminated because they can load that data into memory. The queries now determine what is cached and what can just run quickly since it’s running in memory instead of running from a storage area.

It also uses the Enterprise Security Package and Azure Log Analytics. These two features get wrapped into more of a true enterprise offering and allows your users to use their simplified Active Directory domain log in. Users can connect using Interactive Query and run their workloads without having to have a separate set of credentials, plus you can monitor your nodes from the Log Analytics piece. This helps you bring that data into OMS for a top down view and an understanding of what the whole environment looks like.

Interactive Query offers some great opportunities to run things more efficiently and smaller workloads can be run very quickly.

 

Overview of HDInsight Kafka

Continuing with my HDInsight series, today I’ll be talking about Kafka. HDInsight Kafka will sound much like Storm but as I get into the nuts the bolts you’ll see the differences. Kafka is an open source distributed stream platform that can be used to build real time data streaming pipelines and applications with a message broker functionality, like a message cue.

Some specific Kafka improvements with HDInsight:

  • 99.9% uptime from HDInsight
  • You get 16 terabyte managed discs which increases the scale and reduces the number of required nodes for traditional Kafka clusters, which would have a limit of 1 terabyte.
  • Kafka takes a single rack view, but Azure is designed in 2 dimensions for update and fault domains. Thus, Microsoft designed special tools to rebalance the partitions and replicas. Once you scale out, you would repartition your data and then you’d be able to take advantage of the additional nodes, as well as when you scale down.
  • Kafka allows you to change the number of worker nodes for scaling up/down, depending on the workload and this can be done through the portal or PowerShell or any automation tool within Azure.
  • Direct integration with Azure log analytics. This looks at the virtual machine level information like the disc and the network. The importance of this is it allows you to roll that up into the Microsoft OMS suite for global log analytics. So, when you’re looking at all your resources in Azure through OMS, it helps you to see it at a high level and also drill in for more details.
  • The Zookeeper manages the state of the cluster which helps the concurrency, resiliency and the low latency transactions, as well as the orchestration of the data through the nodes and clusters.
  • Records are stored in topics which is produced by a producer and consumed by consumers. The producers send records to Kafka brokers and each worker node in the cluster is considered a broker. These brokers are what is helping the data move around inside the clusters.

Again, Kafka and Storm sound relatively similar, here’s some major differences:

    • Storm was invented by Twitter; Kafka by LinkedIn. But these are all using the Hadoop platform and it’s an open source, so they can build their own iterations.
    • Storm is meant more for real time message processing; Kafka is for distributed messaging processing.
    • Storm can take data from Kafka and other database system and process the data; Kafka is taking in those streams from things like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.
    • Kafka is a message broker; Storm’s primary use is stream processing.
    • In Storm there is no data storage, you can only stream data through it; Kafka stores the data on the file system. As those streams are processed, Storm can do it much faster, on a micro-batch processing level. Kafka is doing small batches, larger than micro.
    • As far as dependency, Kafka requires Zookeeper for all the orchestration; Storm does not depend on anything externally.
    • Storm has a latency of milliseconds; with Kafka it depends on the source of the data, but typically takes slightly less than 1-2 seconds. So, you’re keeping the data local in Kafka, processing it, then pushing it somewhere else. Whereas with Storm, you’re processing the data in motion as you’re pushing it somewhere else.

Basically, two different ways to solve similar problems depending on the use case. It apparently worked better for LinkedIn to design it this way as opposed to the way that Twitter handles their data.

 

Overview of HDInsight Storm

Next in my series on HDInsight, today I’ll be talking about Storm. HDInsight Storm is a distributed stream processing computational framework. It uses spouts which define information sources and bolts which are manipulations in processing to allow batch distributed processing of streaming data.

Think of it’s apology in the shape of a direct acyclic graph. It’s a DHE where the edges are named streams and direct the data from node to node. When you put it all together, it creates the data transformation pipeline.

When you break it down, it’s topology is like that of map/reduce jobs; the difference being that map/reduce jobs run in individual batches and Storm is processed continuously in real time.

The Storm cluster has 2 different types of nodes. There’s a Master node which executes a Nimbus which assigns tasks to machines and monitors their performance. The Worker node runs Supervisor which assigns tasks to the other worker nodes and operates them as needed.

The Storm cluster can’t monitor its own state and health, so it deploys a Zookeeper node to connect to the Nimbus and Supervisor to keep an eye on things.

The 3 main components of Storm are:

1. The topology which is basically a network for the stream and spout.

2. The stream which is an unbounded pipeline of tuples.

3. The spout which is the source of the data which converts the data to the tuple of streams and then sends the bolts to be processed.

What makes this effective is that the data processing engine is guaranteed as far as every tuple will be fully processed and delivered, giving it a 99.9% uptime SLA from Microsoft. It does this by tracking the lineage of the tuple as it makes its way through the typology. It works like a query system as the messages can be replayed if there’s a failure in delivery.

Some use cases for Storm:

    • Writing the data after it gets processed into an Azure Data Lake Store.
    • As a source for Azure Event Hubs, as well as processing events from here. It can take a vehicle sensor, for instance, and can process it in Event Hubs, then send the data to Cosmos DB or an Azure Storage Blob.
    • Twitter is using Storm in a variety of ways. They use it for discovery on their data, running real time analytics and personalization in real time, so when you log into Twitter it knows your preferences based on past visits. It also works for real time Search and for their own internal revenue optimization.

As with other HDInsight components, it’s used among various typologies to solve and satisfy big data requirements and workloads. For example, if you were doing a customer churn analysis in real time based on a Twitter feed, this would be a technology you would use along side Hadoop.

Overview of HDInsight HBase

In continuation of my series on HDInsight and the different clusters within it, today I’ll cover HBase. HBase is a NoSQL database that provides random access and strong consistency for structured, unstructured and semi-structured data.

It’s a schema-less (or organized by families of columns) database. Another way to describe it is it’s sort of modeled after Google’s Bigtable, where data is stored in the rows of a table and then grouped by a column family. As it’s schema-less, neither the columns themselves or the data types inside of the columns need to be defined before using the data.

Some other key things to be aware of with HBase:

  • As with all the HDInsight components, this get implemented as a managed cluster and a Platform as a Service offering in which we can separate compute nodes from storage.
  • It has a scale out architecture that helps provide automatic sharding or horizontal partitioning of tables, where essentially rows of a table are held separately rather than splitting those columns as we would in a typical table normalization.
  • Strong consistency for read and write as it’s part of the architecture of HBase.
  • Automatic failover built in, so you have multiple clusters that you can failover to multiple nodes.
  • In-memory caching for reads and writes, which helps with performance, as well as moving your data in and out quicker.

Some of the most common workloads:

    • A search engine like I mentioned with Google’s Bigtable, which builds indexes that map terms to webpages that contain them.
    • A key value store. Facebook uses HBase for their messaging system because it’s ideal for storing and managing internet communications.
    • Also, a good repository for collecting sensor data, so where large amounts of data are being pulled into this NoSQL Table and it can be used to build dashboards for reporting.

I still have a few HDInsight technologies to cover in this series. Many of these are interrelated and work together to complete and update data architecture.